WELCOME TO FOUR ON THE FOUR: A BLOG ABOUT JAZZ DRUMMING AND ALL THINGS UNRELATED, BROUGHT TO YOU BY JON McCASLIN

Monday, January 17, 2022

Mel Lewis UNT 1982


Thanks to Todd Bishop from Cruiseship Drummer! who posted this footage of Mel Lewis from a masterclass at the University of North Texas circa. 1982. This is from the same series of videos of Elvin Jones at UNT that I shared last month (in case the embedded video doesn't work, follow this link instead).

Watch, listen and learn:

Monday, January 10, 2022

Art Taylor at the Village Vanguard



Thank you to Casey Schmidt who shared this incredible footage of Arthur Taylor playing at the Village Vanguard (up close and personal!) via the Instagram.



Watch, listen and learn!

Thursday, December 30, 2021

Tim Mah's Recommended Canadian Jazz Albums of 2021















Frequent Four on the Floor correspondent Tim Mah returns once again, offering his extensive yearly list of recommended music released by Canadian jazz artists over the course of 2021. As you will see, read and hear below, there continues to be lots of great music coming out of Canada these days.

Tim's weekly radio program Jazz Today can be heard on CJSW Radio 90.9 fm (Calgary, Alberta, Canada) on Thursday mornings from 530-7am MST. It is also streamed on the CJSW website and available through Apple Podcasts.















Tim Mah's Year in Review 2021

In November 2011, Nicholas Payton published a blog post titled “On Why Jazz Isn’t Cool Anymore.” To read this post, go to the below link:  https://nicholaspayton.wordpress.com/2011/11/27/on-why-jazz-isnt-cool-anymore/ 

The blog post included sentences such as “Jazz died in 1959” and “Jazz is dead.” It also included “Our whole purpose on this planet is to evolve.” and “I say, we are as limited as we think.” The post was controversial and continues to be controversial to some people. Some have interpreted this post as saying that jazz music is dead and others have perpetuated this false narrative. Some people have exploited the phrase “jazz is dead” by using this as a marketing tool. 

My interpretation is that Nicholas Payton said (and continues to say) that the word jazz is no longer appropriate. The music that he creates is part of the evolution of the music. He advocates the term “Black American music” instead of the word “jazz” – Black American music is a broader term and recognizes that this music continues to grow. Ten years later, the term “Black American music” is more widely accepted. 

As quoted in Nate Chinen’s 2018 book called “Playing Changes: Jazz for the New Century,” Kamasi Washington said: “I’ve never believed in the idea that jazz is dying and people don’t like it. People who have taken the time to investigate jazz, they like it for their whole lives.”

To quote the final sentence in the afterword of “Playing Changes,” Nate Chinen said: “The music will flow and fluctuate, keep going. And where to? Anywhere. It just happens.” 

The music continues to grow and inspire. Whether you call it jazz, Black American music, social music, improvised music, creative music, stretch music...It’s all about the music. 

Year in Review

As 2021 draws to a close, it is a great time to take stock of all of the new music that was released during the last twelve months. There was an abundance of new music from Canadians, starting with music form Toronto’s Jesse Ryan (“Bridges”) in December 2020 and closing with a flurry of new releases in November 2021, including Toronto’s Carn Davidson 9 (“The History of Us”) and Montreal’s Benjamin Deschamps (“Augmented Reality”). Toronto and Montreal-based artists continue make up the majority of the new releases. 

Given the 2021 Juno award winners in the jazz music categories (Sammy Jackson, Jocelyn Gould and Andy Milne), could we be seeing a change towards more diversity?  

Some artists (Good Information, Andrew Miller and Jacob Wutzke) released singles only, choosing not to release a full album during the year. Caity Gyorgy released a series of singles over the last two years, culminating in the release of her January 2021 self-released album “No Bounds” and July 2021 album “Now Pronouncing” (released by the Brooklyn-based label, La Reserve Records). Could we see more jazz musicians emphasize the releasing more singles before releasing albums, as is the common practice in the popular music world? 

There were several solo instrumental albums released during the year, including albums from Sam Wilson, Jessica Ackerley, Francois Bourassa, Josh Rager, Erin Rogers, Matthew Stevens and Noam Lemish. Will this trend continue going forward, or was this a pandemic-only trend? 

Looking ahead to 2022

Expect new albums from Laura Anglade & Sam Kirmayer, Caity Gyorgy, Florian Hoefner, Jodi Proznick, Michelle Willis, Seamus Blake, In Common (co-led by Matthew Stevens and Walter Smith III - the third In Common album features Kris Davis, Terri Lyne Carrington and Dave Holland), Tania Gill, Dolman/Rossy/Jobin (Aaron Dolman, Sarah Rossy and Eugenie Jobin), and the Up and Over Trio (Chris Andrew, Rubim de Toledo and Jamie Cooper). 

2021 Albums from Canadians

The purpose of this guest post is to bring more attention to Canadian artists. As fans of this music, our role is to be an advocate for the music. Below is a list of my favourite 30 albums, released from December 2020 to November 2021, and led (or co-led) by Canadians. 

Anna Webber “Idiom”

This two disc album features Anna Webber’s Simple Trio and her Large Ensemble. This is a recording of Anna Webber’s Simple Trio and Idiom VI Large Ensemble concert at Roulette in Brooklyn (September 23, 2021). The music begins at about the ten minute mark: https://youtu.be/N9bLpk0zfcs
































Renee Rosnes “Kinds of Love”  

Kinds of Love

 

Amanda Tosoff “Earth Voices” 

Birdwings (poem by Rumi)

 

Chet Doxas “You Can’t Take It With You” 

You Can’t Take It With You

 

Steph Richards (with Joshua White) “Zephyr” 

Zephyr

 

Andres Vial “When is Ancient?” 

When is Ancient?

 

Benjamin Deschamps “Augmented Reality” 

Augmented Reality

 

CODE Quartet (Christine Jensen, Lex French, Adrian Vedady & Jim Doxas) “Genealogy”

Wind Up

 

Carn Davidson 9 “The History of Us” 

Wisely If Sincerely

 

Dan McCarthy (with Thomas Morgan & Rudy Royston) “A Place Where We Once Lived” 

Cloud Hopping

 

Lina Allemano Four “Vegetables” (feat. Brodie West, Andrew Downing & Nick Fraser) 

Beans (Alternate Take)

 

Badbadnotgood “Talk Memory” 

Talk Meaning

 

Erin Rogers “2000 Miles”

Waxing (Home I)

 

Nick Fraser Quartet “If There Were No Opposites” 

Improvisation (Part 1)

 

Francois Bourassa “L’impact du silence” 

Andante

 

Evan Arntzen “Countermelody” 

Georgia Cabin

 

Josh Rager “Embraceable You” 

You Stepped Out of a Dream

 

Lara Solnicki “The One and the Other” 

Furling Leaf Retrocede

 

Lorne Lofsky “This Song is New” 

Evans from Lennie

 

Matthew Stevens “Pittsburgh” 

Foreign Ghosts

 

Sam Wilson “Into a Heart, Part Two” 

Mourning Motivation

 

Jessica Ackerley “Morning / mourning” 

Morning 2

 

Jessica Ackerley and Daniel Carter “Friendship: Lucid Shared Dreams and Time Travel” 

Welcome Our Friends

 

Borderlands Trio (Kris Davis, Stephan Crump & Eric McPherson) “Wandersphere” 

An Invitation to Disappear

 

Beth McKenna “Beyond Here”

Tides

 

Avataar “Worldview” 

Worldview

 

Misc. (Jerome Beaulieu, Simon Page & William Cote) “Partager l’ambulance” 

X-ALT

 

Alex Lefaivre Quartet “Naufrages” 

Reset

 

Jesse Ryan “Bridges”

Bridges

 

Le Jager “Snow Lotus” 

Proclamacion

 


There was an abundance of new releases from Canadians over the last twelve months. Check out the following list (in alphabetical order) of 40 more Canadian artists with new releases that you can check out.

Andrew Downing & Otterville “Lovesome”
BLOOP (Lina Allemano & Mike Smith) “Proof”
BPM Trio (Phil Dwyer, Ben Dwyer & Mark Adam) “Audi Alteram Partem (Live)”
Carl Mayotte “Pop de Ville, Vol. 1”
Caity Gyorgy “No Bounds” and “Now Pronouncing”
Cory Weeds with Strings “What is There to Say?”
Dan Pitt Quintet “Wrongs”
Dave Young “Mantra”
David Restivo Trio “Arancina”
Earl MacDonald “Consecrated”
Elizabeth Shepherd & Michael Occhipinti “The Weight of Hope”
Emily Steinwall “Welcome to the Garden”
Erin Propp & Larry Roy “We Want All The Same Things”
Gabriel Genest Quintet “Triptyque”
Gordon Grdina “Pendulum,” “Martian Kitties" (featuring Jim Black) and “Klotski"(featuring Christian Lillinger, Shahzad Ismaily, and Mat Maneri)
Hanlon Brothers Quintet “NSTX”
James Danderfer & Quincy Davis “All The Flowers” (feat. Oliver Gannon, Brad Turner & Karl Kohut)
Jazzlab Orchestra “Loguslabusmuzikus”
Jester Champwick (Curtis Nowosad & Joel Visentin) “Homework”
Jocelyn Barth “Tell Him I Said Hello”
Joel Untinen Trio “Facing Paradise”
Julien Fillion “Julien Fillion”
Kellylee Evans “Greenlight”
Kevin Dean “Going Down Slow”
L’abime (Hugo Blouin, Alex Dodier, Gabriel Genest, Jean-Philippe Godbout & Jonathan Turgeon) “L’abime”
Levi Dover “Imaginary Structures”
Lina Allemano & Nick Fraser “Trumpet and Drums Remix Festival”
Mark Eisenman “Jazz Classics” (feat. Steve Wallace & John Sumner)
Mireille Boily “Refuges Mouvants”
Montreal Jazz Trio (Steve Amirault, Adrian Vedady, Jim Doxas) “Montreal Jazz Trio”
Noam Lemish “Erlebnisse”
Oscar Peterson Quartet “A Time for Love: Live in Helsinki, 1987”
Philippe Cote with Marc Copland & Quatuor Saguenay “Bell Tolls Revisited” and “Fleur Revisited”
Pluto Juice (co-led by Anthony Fung and Dayna Stephens; with Rich Brown and Andrew Marzotto) “Pluto Juice”
Sarah Jerrom “Dream Logic” (feat. Harley Card, Rob McBride & Jeff Luciani)
See Through 4 (Pete Johnston, Lina Allemano, Michael Davidson & Jake Oelrichs) “Permanent Moving Parts” 
Shannon Gunn “On a Mountain”
Simon Denizart “Nomad”
The Shuffle Demons “All In”
TuneTown (Kelly Jefferson, Artie Roth & Ernesto Cervini) “Entering Utopia”

Monday, December 27, 2021

The Monday Morning Paradiddle - December 2021









Thanks everyone for checking in during the holiday season. Here is the final Monday Morning Paradiddle column of the year (and oh what a year it's been...) 

Stay tuned as later this week frequent guest columnist Tim Mah, host of CJSW's weekly radio program Jazz Today, will be offering his annual choices for notable Canadian jazz releases of 2021.

Thanks again for your ongoing support. 

Onwards and upwards in the year ahead 2022.

Stay safe everyone and keep your eye on the prize.

*Just a quick reminder: please consider entering your e.mail address on the right side of the page to subscribe to my mailing list. Don't miss out, subscribe today and receive Four on the Floor directly to your inbox!*











*Click on the link that looks like this, located on the right hand side of the page!*



Okay, so here we are.

Here's a list of interesting and thought provoking pieces to check out and keep you occupied and inspired over the holiday break as we head into the year ahead. Please enjoy.

1) Louis Hayes and Mareike Wiening interviewed by the Improv Exchange

2) Pete Zimmer interviewed by Discussions in Percussion

3) Antonio Sanchez featured on the prolific Drummer's Resource Podcast

4) Check out this rare and unique recording of Kenny Clarke on the album Spotlight on Percussion:














If you visit this website and click on the links you'll be able to hear some great unaccompanied recorded audio footage of Klook playing the snare drum.


5) Irish bassist Ronan Guilfoyle interviews Ron Carter, continuing his incredible podcast series "The Art and Science of Time":  
    


6) Two interviews with Jabali Billy Hart from Jake Feinberg and WPFW Radio:



7) Joe Chambers interviewed by Samo Salamon:



8) Ali Jackson Jr. recently released his wonderful instructional series through jazzmemes.org entitled Universe of Grooves:


I've purchased his new series and there is lots of great and very informative material to practice and learn from in here.

Also check out this wonderful feature from Jackson on the late Barry Harris:

 


9) Antonio Sanchez with his interpretation of Thelonious Monk's Evidence:

 


10) Quincy Davis continues with his wonderful Q-Tips educational series on YouTube. As always, these are very informative and well done. 

Check these out and learn from the best:



11) Willie Jones III percussive tribute to the late Ndugu Chancler on Something for Ndugu::



12) Berklee's Francsico Mela and vibraphonist Ed Saindon with a duet on Alone Together:



13) A couple of cool timekeeping clips from the always inspiring Allison Miller: 



14) Kevin Dorn offers some insight into the hi-hat techniques of Jo Jones and Gene Krupa:



15) Thanks to the Drum History Podcast who posted this short clip of Dave Mancini with the Maynard Ferguson big band at the Playboy Jazz Festival circa. 1982:

Dave was my teacher at the International Peace Gardens during the summer of 1993 and it was with his help and encouragement that started me on my journey to where I am today. 

Thanks Dave!

16) A great clip of vibraphonist Terry Gibbs with Barry Harris (piano), Alan Dawson (drums) and Sam Jones (bass):

 


17) A fun early animation from Muppets and Sesame Street creator Jim Henson featuring Chico Hamilton on solo drums:



18) Congratulations to José Mendeles on the release of his latest book A Drummers Ethos:












Purchase his wonderful new publication and his other book The Stoic Drummer through The Revival Drumshop.


19) What am I listening to these days?

Phineas Newborn Jr. "We Three" - Roy Haynes (drums)

Antonio Sanchez "Three Times Three" - Antonio Sanchez (drums)

Rich Perry "Beautiful Love" - Victor Lewis (drums)

Morgan Childs Quartet "On the Street of Dreams" - Morgan Childs (drums)

Neil Swainson "49th Parallel" - Jerry Fuller (drums)

Steve Swallow "Damaged in Transit" - Bill Stewart (drums)

Max Richter "SLEEP"


20) And today's Final Word goes to Dan Weiss with a wonderful piece of advice given to him via his teacher during a summer jazz workshop he attended at the Berklee College of Music, shared with us via one of Dan's many inspiring and informative daily shares on Instagram:

*Please note that I read this one very quickly on IG awhile ago so I am paraphrasing as best I can so the wording is not exact Lol but it's an important message on the art of discipline nevertheless...thanks Dan!*


"If you are serious about wanting to be a musician you have to:

Wake up when you don't feel like waking up.

Work when you don't feel like working.

Practice when you don't feel like practicing."







Monday, December 20, 2021

On Drums: Stewart Copeland










An enjoyable and informative documentary on drums, drummers and drumming from Stewart Copeland:

Monday, December 13, 2021

Jo Jones 1957















Special thanks to Andrew Dickeson who shared this amazing footage of Jo Jones circa. 1957: