WELCOME TO FOUR ON THE FOUR: A BLOG ABOUT JAZZ DRUMMING AND ALL THINGS UNRELATED, BROUGHT TO YOU BY JON McCASLIN

Monday, January 23, 2023

Brilliant Corners: Kenny Clarke



Thanks to Pittsburgh's Thomas Wendt for sharing this wonderful and well researched three-part web series on the musical legacy of Kenny Clarke: 







Monday, January 16, 2023

Brian Blade!











Last April 2022 Brian Blade performed at Koerner Hall in Toronto with Joshua Redman's Mood Swings band featuring Gerald Clayton on piano (filling in for Brad Mehldau) and Christian McBride on bass. Former Toronto and now St. John's, Newfoundland resident and drummer Mark Micklethwaite was in attendance and offered a very thoughtful and articulate post-concert summary via Facebook. He was also kind enough to allow me to share his thoughts here below.

Observations of Brian Blade by Mark Micklethwaite (April 2022)

1. Play for the Room.

Brian can play at every volume, from a whisper to a roar. In a resonant concert hall, drums can take over really easily. Even when he bashes, it doesn't sound too loud. This is not easy to do.

2. Intensity vs Volume.

As per above, you can have great intensity without bashing. Brian's intensity is beyond compare.

3. Explore Every Sound. 

He used sticks, brushes, mallets with sticks on the other end, and some kind of soft plastic brush thing as implements, moving back and forth as needed. He kept his bass drum case to the right of his floor tom and would often toss what he was done with and grab something else. He also had a tambourine (didn't play it) and a few handfuls of bells and jingles that he used during his own rubato / free piece.

He also had a couple of thin towels that he used on the snare (snares on and off) and floor tom, with varying degrees of muffling. He'd put them on and take them off in the same song, as needed. Sometimes he'd move it to his leg for a while and then put if back on later.

4. Cymbals. 

He gets a million sounds from every one. Every cymbal can be a crash, a ride, a gong, a triangle and a shimmer. All sounds are available if you want them.

His touch is unparalleled. He can bash a cymbal and hold the stick against it so it doesn't fully resonate, so you get the crash but not an endless wash.

5. Feathering the Bass Drum. 

This was a revelation for me, having seen him many times but never his right foot for the entire concert. Some say feathering is 'old school' but he played the bass drum on quarter notes almost constantly throughout the night. Felt but not heard. Beater hitting the head ever so lightly and muffling so briefly. In a loud room, bass drum control is uber important.

6. Know the Music. 

Everyone else had sheet music (Gerald got it two days before...) but Brian had everything memorized. And he knew the songs and forms and hits / shots and caught every nuance when needed.

7. Communication. 

Brian was looking at all the members of the band, giving smiles and visual cues. This was especially evident with Gerald. Since it was his first gig ever with the band, Brian seemed to pay extra attention to him, especially the first few tunes. He was smiling and nodding, letting Gerald know that he was welcome in the band and nailing the music. Which he was, in a big way.

Joshua has always been very active as a listener onstage, even when he's standing side stage not playing. He's listening, tapping his foot, reacting to the music, encouraging. Brian cued the end of one drum solo VERY LATE and the only reason Josh caught it was because he was listening and watching and jumped in at the last second with the head out.

8. Process not Perfection. 

This aspect was huge for me, and I'm not sure I can put it into words, but I'm going to try:

From the full view of his every move, I was amazed at how many times he "missed"; how he'd go for a fill up the toms (or down) and miss the crash at the end or flub somehow. And after a brief pause (or not) he'd just keep going. It was as if the trying and missing was part of the point; going beyond what you know, pushing ahead beyond what you can already play. And even when he'd miss, you'd be right there with him, because the intensity and the intent is all right there. One time near the end he almost fell off the stool going for something and I just about leapt out of my seat to try and catch him. Such intensity. So in the moment.

9. Joy. 

People talk about this all the time, but it's true; he translates joy in every way. His body language, the smile on his face, the reverence for the music. It's captivating. Inspiring. Everything.

10. On the drum rider, always request a comfortable seat!


Mark Micklethwaite is an accomplished musician, educator, historian, and administrator. His work experience in the music field includes positions at the Banff Centre, Greenleaf Music, JAZZ.FM91, and Manhattan School of Music. He has facilitated events at various venues including Glenn Gould Studio, Carnegie Hall, Lincoln Center, and Blue Note Tokyo, working with such artists as Dave Douglas, Vijay Iyer, Sheila Jordan, Lee Konitz, Joe Lovano, Pat Metheny, and Oscar Peterson.

As an educator, Mark has developed innovative community and educational programming for students of all ages and facilitated relationships with schools and community groups to present many engaging programs. He has taught classes, workshops, and ensembles in various settings including the Halton, Peel, Durham, and Toronto school boards, Queens College, University of Toronto, York University, and University of Waterloo. Mark helped develop the jazz appreciation curriculum at JAZZ.FM91 and taught 6-week interactive courses to over 300 students.

A successful freelance drummer for over twenty years, Mark has performed at clubs, concert halls, and festivals throughout North America, Europe, and the Middle East. He has performed with musicians such as Guido Basso, Phil Dwyer, Joel Frahm, Dave Frishberg, Molly Johnson, Christian McBride, Donny McCaslin, Mike Murley, Ted Quinlan, Kevin Turcotte, the Turtle Island String Quartet and Kenny Wheeler. He completed his Bachelor of Fine Arts in Music at York University and his Masters of Music at the Manhattan School of Music in New York City.

His work experience in the music field includes key positions at the Manhattan School of Music , Greenleaf Music, York University, JAZZ.FM91, and the Banff Centre. He is currently on staff at Memorial University in St. John’s, NL where he coordinates venues and concerts and also teaches in the School of Music.

Check out Mark perform with Montreal pianist and composer Marianne Trudel on January 26th as part of the Newfound Music Festival at Memorial University January 26-27 

-------------------------------------------

And while we are on the topic of Brian Blade, check out this recent interview with Norah Jones on her Playing Along podcast:

 

And finally here's another favourite that I've shared before, Brian Blade featured on Daniel Lanois' Burning Spear:

Tuesday, January 10, 2023

Happy Birthday Max Roach!

And....we're back.

And there's not a better way to start off with my first blog post of the year 2023 than to wish a very happy 99th birthday to Maxwell Lemuel Roach who was born on this day January 10th, 1924.

Here's a few recent favourite clips to celebrate Max's artistry including:

...a solo with mallets:

 

...and some solo drum audio recordings circa. 1996:
  
 

This particular concert footage filmed at the Newport Jazz Festival circa. 1992 is very dear to me as it was one of my very first introductions to Max Roach and his music:

 

And finally, here's some dynamic footage of Max putting his Italian-made Hollywood Tronic drums though its paces:
 


Happy Birthday Max!


Tuesday, December 27, 2022

Tim Mah's Recommended Canadian Jazz Albums of 2022














Frequent Four on the Floor correspondent Tim Mah returns once again, offering his extensive yearly list of recommended music released by Canadian jazz artists over the course of the past year 2022. As you will see, read and hear below, there continues to be lots of great music coming out of Canada these days.

Tim's weekly radio program Jazz Today can be heard on CJSW Radio 90.9 fm (Calgary, Alberta, Canada) on Thursday mornings from 530-7am MST. It is also streamed on the CJSW website and available through Apple and Google podcasts and the new CJSW mobile streaming app. Tim's weekly radio program and podcast is also recommended by New Music USA.  










Tim Mah's Recommended Canadian Jazz Albums of 2022

When 2022 began, we were in the midst of the fifth wave of the global pandemic and public health restrictions continued to be in place. By the summer, we saw a cautious return to live performances and in person attendance at the summer jazz festivals across Canada. Thank you to the music presenters in Calgary for providing the opportunities for music appreciators, like me, to experience these performances. And much gratitude to the artists for their performances and for speaking with me, and other music fans, at their shows.   

To quote Toronto/Berlin-based trumpet player, composer and bandleader, Lina Allemano, who posted on social media in early 2022, after the Lina Allemano Four album “Vegetables” received a 2022 Juno award nomination for Best Jazz Album (Group):

“…there are a lot of great albums that get released every year by incredible Canadian jazz/improvising musicians that do not get recognized by Canada’s prestigious mainstream music awards, the Junos, or ever get played on Canada’s public radio. I hope people will be interested in having a listen to this year’s Juno-nominated albums, but also in making an effort to seek out albums that did not get nominated - a lot of great music gets made in Canada every year that deserves much wider recognition and support from media and radio at home.” 

With that thought in mind, this blog post is one way to help readers to learn about Canadian albums that were released over the last twelve months. The following list includes albums led or co-led by Canadians. I have also included Canadian artists, whether or not they are living in Canada, and expatriates living abroad. 

Here's twenty five favourite new releases, led or co-led by Canadians (from December 2021 to November 2022) in alphabetical order:   

Andrew Rathbun - Semantics

“Semantics” is one of three albums released over the last twelve months by saxophonist and composer Andrew Rathbun: “THAR” (a project co-led with trumpet player Taylor Haskins, and including bassist Matt Pavolka and drummer Tom Rainey); “Incubated Dilemma Machine,” with Chris Biggs (keys, synths) John Hebert (bass) and Keith Hall (drums) and “Semantics” with Rich Perry (saxophone), Gary Versace (piano), John Hebert (bass), and Billy Drummond (drums).   

“Old Ballad for Hawk”    

  

Annie Dominique Quintet - Reflechir la nuit   

“Reflechir la nuit” is the third album from the Annie Dominque Quintet.

Personnel: Annie Dominique (saxophone, flute and compositions), Jean-Nicolas Trottier (trombone), Jonathan Cayer (piano), Sébastien Pellerin (bass) and Alain Bourgeois drums)   

 “Reflechir la nuit”   

    

Anthony Fung - What Does It Mean to be Free?   

This is the third album from Toronto-native, Los Angeles based drummer, Anthony Fung.

Personnel: Anthony Fung (drums), David Binney (alto saxophone), Luca Alemanno (bass), Luca Mendoza (piano), plus guests including Andrew Renfroe (guitar), Paul Cornish (keyboards), Braxton Cook (alto saxophone), Marcel Camargo (guitar), Oscar Cruz (congas), Roni Eytan (harmonica)

“What Does It Mean to be Free?”    

     

Brodie West Quintet - Meadow of Dreams   

“Meadow of Dreams” is the second full length album from the Toronto-based Brodie West Quintet.   

Personnel: Evan Cartwright (drums, vibraphone and guitar), Josh Cole (bass), Nick Fraser (drums), Tania Gill (piano), Brodie West (alto saxophone)     

https://brodiewest.bandcamp.com/album/meadow-of-dreams    

Caity Gyorgy - Featuring   

This is Calgary-native, Montreal-based Caity Gyorgy’s third release. Each track features a special guest performer.

Personnel: Caity Gyorgy (vocals), Felix Fox-Pappas (piano), Thomas Hainbuch (bass), Jacob Wutzke (drums) with guests: Virginia MacDonald (clarinet), Allison Au, Daniel Barta, Christine Jensen, Tymish Koznarsky (alto saxophone), Lucas Dubovik, Pat LaBarbera, Kyle Tarder-Stoll (tenor saxophone), Kyle Pogline (trumpet), Jocelyn Gould (guitar), Laura Anglade (vocals)   

 “My Cardiologist” 

    

Carsten Rubeling - Headwaters

Calgary-based trombone player and composer Carsten Rubeling’s album “Headwaters” was inspired by nature and the landscape of the Bighorn region of Alberta, which is tucked along the eastern slopes of Alberta’s Rocky Mountains between Banff and Jasper.

Personnel: Carsten Rubeling (trombone), Andre Wickenheiser (trumpet and flugelhorn) Mark DeJong (alto and tenor saxophones), Fraser Calhoun (tenor saxophone), Aaron Young (guitar), Steve Shepard (bass), Trevor Falls (drums)   

The full album of “Headwaters” 

  

Chet Doxas - Rich in Symbols II   

Saxophonist and composer, Chet Doxas, released “Rich in Symbols II” featuring music inspired by the paintings from The Group of Seven, Tom Thomson and Emily Carr.

Personnel: Chet Doxas (saxophones, clarinet, field recordings), Jacob Sacks (piano, mellotron), Joe Grass (pedal steel, guitar, banjo), Zack Lober (bass), Eric Doob (drums)   

“The Jack Pine”    

    

Ernesto Cervini - Joy

Drummer Ernesto Cervini’s album, “Joy,” was inspired by Louise Penny’s Gamache series' of books. There were many musicians on this album across the various songs, including: Felicity Williams, Emilie-Claire Barlow, Amy Cervini, Alex Samaras (vocals), Virginia MacDonald (clarinet), Tara Davidson, Luis Deniz, Kelly Jefferson (saxophones), Jim Lewis (trumpet), William Carn (trombone), Adrean Farrugia (piano), Don Scott (guitar), Dan Fortin, Artie Roth, Rich Brown (bass)   

“Surprised by Joy”    

    

Florian Hoefner Trio - Desert Bloom  

In June, St. John’s, Newfoundland-based pianist and composer, Florian Hoefner, released his second trio album with Toronto-based Andrew Downing (bass) and Nick Fraser (drums)   

“The End of the Tunnel”

  

Gentiane MG - Walls Made of Glass   

In September, Montreal-based pianist and composer Gentiane MG released her third album with her trio, Levi Dover (bass) and Louis-Vincent Hamel (drums).   

“Flowers Laugh Without Uttering a Sound”    

  

Gordon Grdina - Pathways   

Vancouver-based composer, guitar and oud player, Gordon Grdina released five albums over the last twelve months: “Oddly Enough” – a solo album featuring the music of Tim Berne; “Night’s Quietest Hour” with his group Haram, who interpret classic Arabic repertoire; “Pathways” – a trio album with Mark Helias (bass) and Matthew Shipp (piano); “Boiling Point” – a trio album with Matt Mitchell (piano) and Jim Black (drums); and “Gordon Grdina’s The Twain” – the self-titled debut album with a band that includes Michiyo Yagi (electric 21-string koto, 17-string bass koto, electronics), Tamaya Honda (drums, percussion), Kōichi Makigami (voice, Theremin, Jew’s harp, cornet, shakuhachi)   

“Pathways”    

  

Jessica Ackerley (under the band name MAW, with Frank Meadows and Eli Wallace) - A Maneuver Within  

The 2021 album “Morning/mourning” was my introduction to the music of guitarist, composer, visual artist Jessica Ackerley. You can learn a little more about Jessica, who grew up in the Calgary metropolitan area, by reading the following article published by Bandcamp in November 2022:

https://daily.bandcamp.com/features/jessica-ackerley-interview

The article mentions four of Jessica’s 2022 albums (a solo album “Waves;” a duo album “Across the Water” with Patrick Shiroishi (saxophone); the debut album of the avant-garde jazz supergroup, SSWAN [Jessica Ackerley, Patrick Shiroishi (saxophone), Luke Stewart (bass), Chris Williams (trumpet), Jason Nazary (drums)], which released the album “Invisibility is an Unnatural Disaster;” and “A Maneuver Within,” with Frank Meadows (bass) and Eli Wallace (piano) – also known as MAW. A fifth album, “Brooklyn/Kingston,” is a drum and guitar duo album, with drummer Henry Mermer.   

This is a live performance by MAW (Meadows, Ackerley, Wallace), Live at the Bushwick Series (2021 in Brooklyn, New York).    

  

Jocelyn Gould - Golden Hour   

Jocelyn Gould and her band performed music from “Golden Hour” during the 2022 summer jazz festival in Calgary. This is her second album and expect a new album in 2023 with guitarist Randy Napoleon.   

Personnel: Jocelyn Gould (guitar, voice), Jon Gordon (saxophone), Will Bonness (piano), Rodney Whitaker (bass), Quincy Davis (drums)   

“Serendipity”    

  

Joy Lapps - Girl in the Yard   

“Girl in the Yard” is the fifth album as a leader for Joy Lapps, and her first with all original music. It pays tribute to the women in her life, who have helped develop her mastery of the steelpan and supported her success in the steelpan movement. The core ensemble on the album includes guitarist Elmer Ferrer, pianist Jeremy Ledbetter, drummer Larnell Lewis, and electric bassist Andrew Stewart.   

“Sharifa the Great”    

  

Kate Wyatt - Artifact   

Pianist Kate Wyatt has been a mainstay of the Montréal jazz scene for over twenty years. In July, she released her debut album, “Artifact.” 

Personnel: Kate Wyatt (piano), Lex French (trumpet), Adrian Vedady (bass) and Jim Doxas (drums).   

“Artifact”    

    

Laura Anglade & Sam Kirmayer - Venez donc chez moi   

Toronto-based vocalist Laura Anglade teamed up with Montreal-based guitarist Sam Kirmayer (and New York-based accordionist Benjamin Rosenblum on two tracks) on this album, an homage to France, where she was born. It features jazz versions of French classics made famous by Maurice Chevalier, Boris Vian, Edith Piaf, and Jacques Brel to name a few.   

“Venez donc chez moi”    

    

Luis Deniz - El Tinajon  

In May, Cuban-born, Toronto-based saxophonist and composer Luis Deniz released his debut album “El Tinajon,” which reflects influences from his upbringing in Camaguey, Cuba and Florida with his later life move to Canada.

Personnel: Luis Deniz (alto and soprano saxophones, compositions), Rafael Zaldivar (piano, keyboards). Roberto Occhipinti (acoustic bass), Amhed Mitchel (drums, vocals) Adis Galindo (vocals) and Jorge Luis Torres Papiosco (congas, bata drums, minor percussion)  

“Reflexiones”    

    

Melissa Stylianou - Dream Dancing  

Vocalist Melissa Stylianou’s new project features bass player, Ike Sturm, and guitar player, Gene Bertoncini.   

“My Ideal”    

    

Michael Blake - Combobulate   

Michael Blake’s new album, “Combobulate,” features the unique instrumentation of two tubas, trumpet, trombone, saxophone and drums.

Personnel: Michael Blake (saxophones, flute), Steven Bernstein (trumpet), Clark Gayton (trombone), Bob Stewart (tuba), Marcus Rojas (tuba), Allan Mednard (drums)   

 “Combobulate”    

    

Matthew Stevens & Walter Smith III - In Common III   

Toronto-native, guitarist Matthew Stevens has released three albums with saxophonist Walter Smith III under the project name “In Common.” The third album, “In Common III,” was released in March and features Kris Davis (piano), Dave Holland (bass) and Terri Lyne Carrington (drums).   

“Orange Crush”      

    

Rafael Zaldivar - RUMBA   

Montreal-based pianist and composer Rafael Zaldivar is joined by numerous guest musicians on his new album, “RUMBA.” The term RUMBA refers to the social gatherings of the black community in Havana, Cuba. At the beginning of the twentieth century, these groups met to celebrate and praise the deceased in ceremonies full of song and dance. RUMBA promotes social interaction, cultural exchange, and the transmission of Africanism, all of which feeds into the sound of this album.   

“Dolor de amar” (featuring Kurt Rosenwinkel)   

    

Tania Gill Quartet - Disappearing Curiosities   

This is the second album for the Tania Gill Quartet, released more than a decade after the debut album. 

Personnel: Tania Gill (piano, synthesizer), Lina Allemano (trumpet), Rob Clutton (bass), Nico Dann (drums)   

Below is a video of Tania Gill, Rob Clutton and Nico Dann performing songs from the album in concert:

    

Seamus Blake - New York Factor, Vol. 1   

Saxophonist Seamus Blake is currently based in the Netherlands. His new album features some of his long time New York-based collaborators: Bill Stewart (drums), Alexander Claffy (bass), David Kikoski (piano) and Victor Lewis (drums).   

“Points of a Star”    

  

The Ostara Project - The Ostara Project   

The Ostara Project is a Canadian jazz supergroup, co-led by Amanda Tosoff and Jodi Proznick. Their debut album featured the following personnel: Amanda Tosoff (piano), Jodi Proznick (bass), Rachel Therrien (trumpet), Allison Au (saxophone), Joanna Majoko (voice), Sanah Kadoura (drums), Jocelyn Gould (guitar).   

“Bye Bye Blackbird” (arranged by Joanna Majoko)      

  

Tommy Crane - We’re All Improvisers Now   

Tommy Crane is a composer, drummer and percussionist, who divides his time between New York and Montreal. After he returned home to Montreal from Italy (where he was teaching drums and improv classes at Siena Jazz Institute) in mid-March 2020, he began putting his energy into writing and recording a new album in his apartment. 

Personnel: Tommy Crane (compositions, drums, cymbals, sensory percussion, percussion, glockenspiel, synth bass, vocals, plus others). Guests include: Pietro Amato (French horn), Simon Angell (guitar, space guitar), Jordan Brooks (electric bass), Charlotte Greve (alto saxophone), Logan Richardson (alto saxophone), Chris Speed (clarinet)   

“Curated Reality”    

  

This blog advocates for Canadian artists and their music. In addition to the artists listed above, there were many more Canadian artists with new releases over the last twelve months. Have a listen to the music from these artists below (in alphabetical order):   

Aaron Dolman, Sarah Rossy, Eugenie Jobin “Are You Here to Help?”
Adams, Dunn & Haas “Future Moons” 
Alvaro Rojas “Music for 22” 
Alex Le Blanc et son Orchestre “Musique pour jeunes fous” 
Bobby Wiens “Temporary Songs” (with Denin Slage-Koch) and “Let’s Call This” (with Spencer Zweifel & Seth Lewis) 
Carl Mayotte “Escale” 
Chris Andrew “Home” 
Chris Pruden “Suns” 
Colin Fisher & Mike Gennaro “Tactile Stories” 
Darren Johnston “Breathing Room” (with Carmen Staaf and Michael Formanek) and “Life in Time” (with Geof Bradfield, Clark Sommers and Dana Hall) 
David Virelles “Nuna” 
Dan McCarthy “Songs of the Doomed” 
Diana Panton “Blue” 
Doug Tielli & Nick Fraser “In the Same Room” 
Eric Chenaux “Say Laura” 
Eucalyptus “Moves” 
Francois Jalbert & Jerome Beaulieu “L’aeronaute” 
Grant Stewart “The Lighting of the Lamps” 
Hilario Duran & David Virelles “Front Street Duets” 
Im Herridge Lacombe (Jihye Im, Marshal Herridge, Valerie Lacombe) “Movin’ Up” 
Jacob Chung “Epistle” 
Jairus Sharif “Water & Tools” 
Jean-Michel Leblanc “Intrique” 
Jean-Michel Pilc “Alive (Live at Diese Onze, Montreal), Set 1 and 2” 
Jim Head “Prismatic” 
John Lee “The Artist” 
Justin Haynes “The Remembrancer: Justin Haynes Plays the Compositions of Patrick O’Reilly” 
Karen Ng “Impossible Burger” 
Karl Silveira “A Porta Aperta” 
Lauren Falls “A Little Louder Now” 
Local Talent “Remotism” 
Lucas Dann “Solo” 
Mathieu Soucy “Recollecting” 
Michael Johancsik “Breakglass Sessions” 
Michael Sarian “Living at the End of the World” and “After the Rain” 
Michel Donato “Michel Donato et ses amis Quebecois” 
Mike Bruzzese “Even When I’m Dreaming” 
Mike Downes “Mind Mirrors” 
Neil Swainson “Fire in the West” 
Noam Lemish “Twelve” 
Orchestre national de jazz de Montreal “Equal = Orchestra” and “Pandemonia!” 
PJ Perry “No Hugs” 
Rick Rosato “Homage” 
Roberto Occhipinti “The Next Step” 
Sam Kirmayer “In This Moment” 
Sean Fyfe “Late Night” 
Simon Millerd “Cloud Mountain” 
Steve Kaldestad “Live at Frankie’s Jazz Club” 
Sophianne Girard “For Some Reason” 
The Imaginary Brass Band “The Imaginary Brass Band” 
Trevor Falls “Les Filles” 
Way North “New Dreams, Old Stories” 
William Carn “Choices” 
Yannick Rieu Generation Quartet “Qui qu’en grogne”

Monday, December 19, 2022

The Monday Morning Paradiddle - December 2022

Well, here we are! Yet another year of music, drumming and blogging has gone by and now here before you is the December 2022 edition of the Monday Morning Paradiddle, my almost monthly jazz drumming variety column. Hope you dig it.

I'll be taking a break over the holidays and will be back at some point in the New Year. In the meantime, enjoy a nice holiday break and check out all the cool stuff below. There's always something new to watch, listen and learn from.

However, CJSW's Tim Mah will also be back next week for one more guest blogpost of the year, with his compilation of Recommended Canadian Jazz Albums of 2022. His annual selections are always eagerly anticipated and highlight a lot of the great jazz music that came out of Canada in the past year so make sure to check that out.












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And now, and without further ado, here's today's offerings:

1. Check out this piece from Jazz Wax on the historic new Elvin Jones release on Blue Note Records: Revival - Live at Pookie's Pub

2. Thanks to Chad Anderson for sending along this recorded interview with the great Alvin Fielder

3. Tyshawn Sorey featured by in this Tidal interview Personal Standards

4. Check out and subscribe to Vinnie Sperrazza's excellent new Substack series Chronicles with extended pieces on Paul Motian, Tony Williams, Pete LaRoca, Freddie Waits and more

5. Francisco Mela does all the talking in these podcast episodes of All the Talking Part One Part Two

6. Antonio Sanchez featured in Jazz Times magazine Not Such a Bad Hombre After All

...and in this interview with Leo Sidran from his The Third Story podcast:

 

7. Fantastic brushwork from Jeff Hamilton!

8. And even more great brushwork from Portland's Mel Brown!!!

 

9. George Fludas interviewed in the podcast series Off The Bandstand with Christian Wiggs:

10. Ed Soph interviewed by Aldo Mazza for his ongoing series Shaping Your Journey:

11. Billy Drummond interviewed by Eric Hayslett:

12. John Riley featured on Drummer Nation!:

13. Quincy Davis continues with his fantastic and always informative YouTube series Q-Tips:

 

14. Jerome Jennings offers his masterclass Drum Evolution: From Jazz to Hip Hop:

 

15. 10 Reasons to Love Brian Blade from Thomas Wendt and the Drum Candy Podcast:

 

(What only 10 reasons? Lol)

16. And this interview with Duduka Da Fonseca:

 

17. These two recordings of Big Sid Catlett have been making the rounds lately including this solo with Louis Armstrong...

...and this one with Dizzy Gillespie and Charlie Parker:

18. A wonderful drums and piano duo session from Allison Miller and Carmen Staaf!

19. Ulysses Owens Jr. offers these thoughts on snare drum tuning brought to us from the nice people at Evans Drumheads:

20. And dig this trio of Ulysses Owens Jr., pianist Peter Martin and bassist Bob DeBoo on a burning rendition of Cherokee:

21. Joe Lovano and his Classic Quartet featuring Lewis Nash, on Lovano's composition Big Ben from a recent performance at SFJAZZ:

 


22. What am I listening to these days?

Archie Alleyne & Frank Wright Quartet "Up There" - Archie Alleyne (drums), Frank Wright (vibraphone)

Elvin Jones "Revival: Live at Pookie's Pub" - Elvin Jones (drums)

Miles Davis "A Tribute to Jack Johnson" - Billy Cobham (drums)

Dave Holland "Triplicate" - Jack DeJohnette (drums)

Ben Webster & Harry Edison "Ben & Sweets" - Clarence Johnson (drums)

Oscar Peterson Trio "We Take Requests" - Ed Thigpen (drums)

Jeff Hamilton Trio "Dynavibes" - Jeff Hamilton (drums), Frits Landesbergen (vibraphone)

Jim Hall & Ron Carter "Alone Together"


23. And today's Final Word goes to Antonio Sanchez via Instagram:

"Playing in a band is one of the best exercises in democracy. It encourages individualism/self-expression but you're all working towards a bigger goal. The exercise also fails if you're not constantly looking out for one another. Everybody should try it at some point in life."

- Antonio Sanchez


Thanks again for all your support, keep swinging' and see you in 2023!